Documents
References
Million-Kell Story

Photograhs
Kell/Million gravestones

 

Million Descendants

William Million
Abt 1600-

John Million, Sr.
1637-1700

John Million, Jr.
1673-1717

Robert Million, Sr.
1695-1773

Daniel Benjamin Million
1750-1816

Haman Million
1788-1854

Milton Million
1819-1884

Burrell Million
1851-1920

Ora C. Million Zerby
1876-1968

Names
Surnames

 

 

 

 

Samuel Kell's
Descendants

Samuel Kell, Sr.
prev 1748-aft 1820

Samuel Kell, Jr.
1778-1823

Benjamin Kell
1811-1877

Samuel Kell
1833-1928

Emma C.Kell Million
1858-1937

Ora C. Million Zerby
1876-1968

 

Names

 

Million Family

(For additional information on an indiviual click on his name on the left side)

The first record of the Million family is the birth of John Million, Sr. in Middlesex, England in 1637. His father William was born about 1600 in England. When John was 32 he came to America. There are records showing that on 18 October 1669 William Berkley, Governor of Virginia, gave 200 acres to Stephen Costen for the transport of four persons to Virginia, one of whom was John Million, who arrived in Northampton, Virginia from England.  John lived the rest of his life in Northumberland Co. Virginia. John's son, John Million, Jr. and grandson, Robert Million, Sr. also remained in Northumberland Co., Virginia.

In 1806 Daniel Benjamin Million migrated to Madison Co., Kentucky and then to Estill County. His son, Haman, settled in Harrison Co., Kentucky and is buried in the Million Cemetery.

Milton Million came to Lewis County, Missouri  prior to 1847, where he was made deputy clerk on January 2, 1847. He was the county assessor from 1848 to 1854. In 1878 he was in the state legislature representing Lewis County. He also was the president of the Monticello emancipation meeting.

Burrell Million was born in 1851 in Monticello, Missouri where he was reared. We have canceled checks showing he was in Farber, Missouri in 1904. Sometime after that he settled in Apache, OK, first engaging in the banking business in Apache, then moving to Supply in 1911 where he became owner and president of the Bank of Supply which he successfully conducted to the time of his death. He led an active business life, giving liberally of both his time and means to the upbuilding of the community. He died in 1920 of heart trouble. Both Burrell and Emma are buried in Hennesey, Oklahoma.

Ora Million attended a Catholic college at a Catholic convent in Quincy, Illinois. She was originally married to Dr. Arthur Perry. She had two sons, Uncle Don and Uncle Sam, and a daughter, Thelma, who died the same year that she was born . Dr. Perry was practicing medicine in Missouri when my Grandfather Million convinced him to move to Apache. There was no doctor in Apache at the time. Dr, Perry died in 1911 while helping to fight an epidemic in western Oklahoma. In 1916 she married Percy B. Zerby who was working in her father's bank. They had a daughter Maxyne Cecila Zerby.

 

 

 

 

Kell Family

Samuel Kell, Sr. was a citizen of E. Fallowfield Twp., Chester County, Pennsylvania. According to the first US Census in 1790, his family consisted of six sons, two daughters and his wife. His wife's Christian name, Elizabeth, was found on a deed to some land in 1789 to which she made her mark. After this, he and his wife disappeared from any records as far as we have discovered and only an occasional tradition remains to tell of their existence. Tradition says that this worthy couple emigrated to Western Ohio and made their home in Warren County. Some of their children went west between 1814 and 1820.

Samuel Kell took part in the American Revolution at the battles of Chadd's Ford and Brandywine that were fought in Chester Co., Pennsylvania. He served in Captain Through's Company, Colonel Patterson Bell's Regiment, Chester Co., Pennsylvania militia.This is documented in the Pennsylvania Archives Fifth Series, volume 5, page 811-819. (For DAR refer to National Numbers 93937 and 115823.)

There is no information on Samuel Kell, Jr. or his son Benjamin.

Samuel Kell and his daughter Alice took part in the land rush when the Cheyenne and Apache Reservations were open.  He lost his claim in litigation when a drunk whom he gave a ride on his wagon fell off and claimed the land first. He lived with his daughter who received 160 acres near Bison, Oklahoma. Samuel was a very tall man, with gray hair which curled at the neck and a beard. He did not smoke, drink or chew tobacco. He was a convert to the Catholic faith, although one of his brothers was a Baptist minister.

Before the land run Samuel was in Texas where his son Edwin was born in Macomb, Grayson County, Texas in 1860. He then moved to Missouri, locating in Williamstown, Lewis County, where he was a merchant. His son also was in the land rush, staking a claim near Okarche. Edwin was one of the first settlers in Apache.